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10400 words in 24 hours
Konuyu gönderen: Nicole Coati

Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
İspanya
Local time: 20:43
Üye
İspanyolca > İngilizce
+ ...
To quote the song: Jul 11

As long as the price is right.

I'm with DJ. Of course it's possible. You buckle down and arrange for someone to bring you some sustenance every three or four hours because you just don't have the TIME, FFS, but on no account to speak to you, and certainly not annoy you in any way, and you sit at it until it's done. Then you go to bed and collect.

24 hours are 24 hours. 433 words an hour? 7 words a minute? A cinch for a one-off.

Although I do agree it's more than irksome being told by Mr Pushy, "Yes, you can". I rather like the choice of saying "Yes, I can" or "No, I can't".


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Gabriele Demuth  Identity Verified
Birleşik Krallık
Local time: 19:43
Üye (2014)
İngilizce > Almanca
Really!? Jul 11

David GAY wrote:

It seems to me they want you to miss the deadline, which would be a good reason for not paying you. From which country is this outsourcer?

[Modifié le 2017-07-07 14:02 GMT]

[Modifié le 2017-07-07 14:08 GMT]


An outsourcer can't make me miss a deadline! You look at the job and then you offer a feasible deadline, some outsourcers would decide to split the job.


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Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
İspanya
Local time: 20:43
Üye
İspanyolca > İngilizce
+ ...
Per diem is relative Jul 11

I cut my teeth in a translation agency which got not only one pound of flesh out of me, but several. I was regularly doing KKK of Spanish-English each day, French-English, and English-Spanish too, which was corrected later by the owner of the agency, a native Spaniard. He also took a good look at my English stuff because he knew much more about technical English than I did. There were few complaints about quality, even though everything was urgent. Later I worked my own setup with one particular large-volume customer, where everything was urgent too. I got used to urgent + quality.

Now I work for myself - I get up early, dose myself with coffee, concentrate on the screen and touch-type, with a rest for breakfast proper, and have about 3K done before mid-morning when people start to interrupt with phone calls and e-mails and life. Then I eat, have a siesta and do maybe 2K more, and by 5 or 6 pm the rest of the day is for other things. If I have to, I'll do 7K or 8K a day, but not over long periods. Like I said before, the day has 24 hours, and it depends how you use them. I sometimes wonder about the "daily word counts" I read here, and I've never said anything about it before, but it's not being superhuman. It all depends on your experience and your daily setup, and not all family setups permit it, but I can do it and I do do it.

Sometimes I'm offered the kind of thing Nicole was offered (but I wouldn't consider it if they were as rude as they were to her), and I will either decline an impossible task, or try to maybe get a small extension on the deadline to do it all myself rather than share, which is often more troublesome and time-consuming than it's worth, with translator e-mails going back and forth asking whether we're using Quality Manager or Head of Quality etc.

I can't remember the last time I missed a deadline, and never got any quality issues on any of those big ones, so it seems to be working.

[Edited at 2017-07-11 09:46 GMT]


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Erik Freitag  Identity Verified
Almanya
Local time: 20:43
Üye (2006)
Hollandaca > Almanca
+ ...
Gaussian distribution Jul 11

I reckon that the average daily output of translators producing translations of comparable quality generally follows a Gaussian distribution. There will inevitably be translators on both sides of the bell (although those on the left side will be struggling to make a living). It took me a couple of years to realize that I'm seemingly quite far on the "fast" side of the distribution curve: I used to think that most people work more or less at a similar speed as I. That's a fallacy that probably most translators fall for, as we usually have no direct means of comparing our speeds. In fact, in most cases that assumption is valid (precisely because the majority of all translators will be found near the peak of the distribution curve, which may or may not be around the frequently mentioned 2.000-3.000 words per day).

My point is: Just because I can't do more than x words in a day, that doesn't mean that someone isn't easily able to do 3 times as much, with comparable quality. Insofar, I agree that general statements along the line of "that's just not possible" are nonsense.

As far as I'm concerned, I agree with what Lincoln Hui said: My translation speed most of the time doesn't translate into shorter deadlines for clients, but into more jobs for me (and thus more income) within a given timeframe.









[Edited at 2017-07-11 12:33 GMT]


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Robert Forstag  Identity Verified
Amerika Birleşik Devletleri
Local time: 14:43
Üye (2003)
İspanyolca > İngilizce
+ ...
The Perfect Storm Jul 11

Mervyn Henderson wrote:

Sometimes I'm offered the kind of thing Nicole was offered (but I wouldn't consider it if they were as rude as they were to her), and I will either decline an impossible task, or try to maybe get a small extension on the deadline to do it all myself rather than share, which is often more troublesome and time-consuming than it's worth, with translator e-mails going back and forth asking whether we're using Quality Manager or Head of Quality etc.


[Edited at 2017-07-11 09:46 GMT]


I agree with this. No guarantee that your partner(s) in such a scenario are going to be as good as you, and with such a time-sensitive project, such interruptions are most unwelcome (especially when no extra compensation is ever built in to account for the extra time involved).

To reiterate, the kinds of extreme rush jobs that are the subject of this thread are generally doable when something like a "perfect storm" exists for the translator offered the project: availability and low fatigue at time of offer, high familiarity with the subject matter, high typing speed, high improvisational skills, high tolerance for stress and sleep deprivation, and high flexibility in accommodating one's schedule to the demands of the project.

I've always been fortunate with this kind of work in never having serious complaints raised. But if you don't have an existing relationship with the assigning outsourcer, it is not out of place to assure that they understand the limitations involved in such work in order to prevent having one's pay docked later on.

[Edited at 2017-07-11 14:09 GMT]


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Robert Forstag  Identity Verified
Amerika Birleşik Devletleri
Local time: 14:43
Üye (2003)
İspanyolca > İngilizce
+ ...
Time is Money Jul 11

Erik Freitag wrote:
As far as I'm concerned, I agree with what Lincoln Hui said: My translation speed most of the time doesn't translate into shorter deadlines for clients, but into more jobs for me (and thus more income) within a given time frame.


This brings out an important point: No matter what the externally imposed deadline is, there is always a certain amount of internal pressure on the translator to complete a job as quickly as possible (i.e., because "time is money," and also because completing a project means being free to take on other work).

This is an especially important factor to consider in a field where the fee structures simply do not allow for a slow and deliberate approach to one's work (at least for those whose sole means of livelihood is the income from such work).

This said, there is a difference between me working all day on Sunday for a project due on Wednesday simply because I want to clear my schedule for the coming week, and having to do so because the project in question is due Monday morning. The latter situation will, accordingly, involve an additional charge.


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Maija Cirule  Identity Verified
Letonya
Local time: 21:43
Üye (2014)
Almanca > İngilizce
+ ...
My point exactly Jul 11

Erik Freitag wrote:

I reckon that the average daily output of translators producing translations of comparable quality generally follows a Gaussian distribution. There will inevitably be translators on both sides of the bell (although those on the left side will be struggling to make a living). It took me a couple of years to realize that I'm seemingly quite far on the "fast" side of the distribution curve: I used to think that most people work more or less at a similar speed as I. That's a fallacy that probably most translators fall for, as we usually have no direct means of comparing our speeds. In fact, in most cases that assumption is valid (precisely because the majority of all translators will be found near the peak of the distribution curve, which may or may not be around the frequently mentioned 2.000-3.000 words per day).

My point is: Just because I can't do more than x words in a day, that doesn't mean that someone isn't easily able to do 3 times as much, with comparable quality. Insofar, I agree that general statements along the line of "that's just not possible" are nonsense.

As far as I'm concerned, I agree with what Lincoln Hui said: My translation speed most of the time doesn't translate into shorter deadlines for clients, but into more jobs for me (and thus more income) within a given timeframe.









[Edited at 2017-07-11 12:33 GMT]

The fact that I am not able to sing an opera aria does not mean that nobody can do this. C'est la vie.


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Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
İspanya
Local time: 20:43
Üye
İspanyolca > İngilizce
+ ...
Can't help wondering ... Jul 11

... how it all turned out for them in the end. It's been a while now. Did they save the day, or did they have to say "No, we can't" too? Perhaps we'll never know how the 24-hour 10K Challenge went.

[Edited at 2017-07-11 15:19 GMT]


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Nicole Coati  Identity Verified
İspanya
Local time: 20:43
Üye (Jan 2017)
İspanyolca > Almanca
+ ...
KONUYU BAŞLATAN
I told them "Sorry, but I can´t". Jul 11

For me personally, this project was not doable (two small children, who are already enjoying their summer break etc.).

Best from Spain,
Nicole.


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Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
İspanya
Local time: 20:43
Üye
İspanyolca > İngilizce
+ ...
Ask politely ... Jul 11

... after a prudent period. What I meant was how it went for Mr/Ms Pushy, since it was obvious you weren't having your arm twisted yourself. Maybe you'll all laugh about it one day. But if you do ask them, try not to snigger ...

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Nicole Coati  Identity Verified
İspanya
Local time: 20:43
Üye (Jan 2017)
İspanyolca > Almanca
+ ...
KONUYU BAŞLATAN
... Jul 11

yes, it became obvious to me the moment I hit the send button... that's what happens when you reply ina rush.

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Sheila Wilson  Identity Verified
İspanya
Local time: 19:43
Üye (2007)
İngilizce
+ ...
Additional factor Jul 11

One factor that I don't believe has been discussed here is the known advantage of leaving a translation for a while before coming back to check it through with a fresh mind and eye. Maybe it isn't so necessary for technical translations (I don't know), but for my marketing texts I find it's imperative to take a break of at least a few hours, and preferably overnight (in other words, to sleep on it). Once you've had a break it's far easier to spot typos and interference from the source language structure. When you've only just finished translating a text you do have a tendency to think it must be OK as it is, particularly if you're tired. So, I think that even if I could translate 10k words in 24 hours (I can't!), I'd want to delay delivery for several more hours, unless it was expressly confirmed that the text was going to be proofread by another person.

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Mervyn Henderson  Identity Verified
İspanya
Local time: 20:43
Üye
İspanyolca > İngilizce
+ ...
Too right Sheila ... Jul 11

... my wife says that when I moan about a toughie trad, and that all I need is to step back for a bit. And time after time she's right.

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Robert Forstag  Identity Verified
Amerika Birleşik Devletleri
Local time: 14:43
Üye (2003)
İspanyolca > İngilizce
+ ...
One of the inherent disadvantages of extreme rush work Jul 11

Sheila Wilson wrote:

One factor that I don't believe has been discussed here is the known advantage of leaving a translation for a while before coming back to check it through with a fresh mind and eye. Maybe it isn't so necessary for technical translations (I don't know), but for my marketing texts I find it's imperative to take a break of at least a few hours, and preferably overnight (in other words, to sleep on it). Once you've had a break it's far easier to spot typos and interference from the source language structure. When you've only just finished translating a text you do have a tendency to think it must be OK as it is, particularly if you're tired. So, I think that even if I could translate 10k words in 24 hours (I can't!), I'd want to delay delivery for several more hours, unless it was expressly confirmed that the text was going to be proofread by another person.


An inherent disadvantage of the kinds of extreme rush projects under discussion here is that there is no time for such reviewing with fresh eyes. One can well imagine the quality of proofreading undertaken by a translator who has just completed 10-15 hours of solid work and is dead tired.

In the best of cases, one hopes for help "on the back end" (i.e., good proofreading by someone at the agency that has contracted the rush project). Sometimes, there is no time for that either.

[Edited at 2017-07-11 16:58 GMT]


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Texte Style
Local time: 20:43
Fransızca > İngilizce
I'm surprised Jul 11

nobody's yet brought out the old chestnut about quality, speed and low budget, you can only pick two.

So I can't then disagree with them saying you can't have quality with speed, only fit for purpose and speed, but still it has to be billed a lot. If anything, to teach the client a lesson, that you don't work your butt off for peanuts.

I did manage about 11,000 words in a day once (an office working day at that!) but there were quite a few repetitions and I knew the subject inside out, and I knew the client didn't care if there were a few bits that were subjected to the "if in doubt leave it out" maxim. I was not proud of the work at all, it was the student I'd had foisted on me who had spent all week on the first thousand words or so, that I had to re-do, so then I sent her home and just ploughed on till it was finished.


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